<menu id="ckkoq"><strong id="ckkoq"></strong></menu><menu id="ckkoq"><strong id="ckkoq"></strong></menu>
<menu id="ckkoq"><tt id="ckkoq"></tt></menu>
  • <menu id="ckkoq"></menu>
  • <xmp id="ckkoq">
    <nav id="ckkoq"><strong id="ckkoq"></strong></nav>

    The shadows grow longer in Fukushima

    By WANG XU in Tokyo | China Daily | Updated: 2022-08-15 09:18
    Share
    Share - WeChat
    The Fukushima No 2 nuclear power plant, as seen in March, is part of a complex that has come to define the region in northeastern Japan since disaster struck in March 2011. THE YOMIURI SHIMBUN/AP IMAGES

    As Tokyo tries to woo residents back, plans to dump toxic water pose more perils

    For Setsuko Matsumoto, 71, there will be no return to her hometown in Fukushima prefecture-that is despite the determined efforts of the Japanese government to win her over to the idea that it is safe to do so. And that goes for the many like Matsumoto who cannot countenance how they can once again live in neighborhoods that were devastated by the earthquake and tsunami more than a decade ago.

    Having run a hair salon for almost 30 years in Futaba, a town 4 kilometers from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Matsumoto believes the place has no future. The government would have her believe otherwise. On Aug 30, it will lift the last of the restrictions imposed that have prevented former residents from living in the region permanently. It claims radiation levels arising from the nuclear accident in March 2011 are now low enough to be deemed safe.

    "I don't think that the town will be able to go on, even with the return of some elderly residents," says Matsumoto.

    Although 11 years have passed since the Fukushima plant's cooling systems were severely damaged in the disaster, triggering the meltdown of three reactors and the release of large amounts of radiation, Matsumoto has her reasons for not moving back.

    "Residing in Futaba is not an option for me," she says. "The lack of shopping and medical care opportunities can't be solved anytime soon and I don't have a reason to relocate to a place with a worse living environment."

    Over the years, there have been sustained efforts-both from the top down and the bottom up-aimed at driving Fukushima's reconstruction and revitalization. Seemingly limitless funds have been spent on that process, from the national government all the way down to township levels. These efforts are all bound up in the Japanese government's economic and political ambitions to show the world that it has succeeded in managing the nuclear crisis.

    Yet that strong desire to change Fukushima into something resembling its old form, or even something better, has encountered resistance from the likes of Matsumoto, who have lived with the effects of trauma for more than a decade.

    1 2 3 4 Next   >>|
    Top
    BACK TO THE TOP
    English
    Copyright 1995 - . All rights reserved. The content (including but not limited to text, photo, multimedia information, etc) published in this site belongs to China Daily Information Co (CDIC). Without written authorization from CDIC, such content shall not be republished or used in any form. Note: Browsers with 1024*768 or higher resolution are suggested for this site.
    License for publishing multimedia online 0108263

    Registration Number: 130349
    FOLLOW US
    护士坐我腿上上下不停的
    <menu id="ckkoq"><strong id="ckkoq"></strong></menu><menu id="ckkoq"><strong id="ckkoq"></strong></menu>
    <menu id="ckkoq"><tt id="ckkoq"></tt></menu>
  • <menu id="ckkoq"></menu>
  • <xmp id="ckkoq">
    <nav id="ckkoq"><strong id="ckkoq"></strong></nav>